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subdural haematomas, fractures and rickets

This is a case which has been in the news lately. I was tempted to write a blog on it, but I have to be frank and say that the summary prepared by Leading Counsel in the case which appears here :-

http://www.familylawweek.co.uk/site.aspx?i=ed97208

would be hard to be bettered.

I think that Islington were in an extremely difficult spot here. On the one hand, the case did not go before a Jury in the criminal trial because the trial Judge did not consider that it would be possible given the medical evidence for the criminal standard of proof to be met.  (It may have gone higher than that,  since it wasn’t even put before the jury with a direction to acquit, and it may have been that the criminal summing up went very close to saying that the defence were right)

But Islington were faced with medical professionals in their area saying that the injuries were as serious as it is possible to be, and were on the balance of probabilities caused non-accidentally, and faced with another child of the family.

They had a tough decision to make – either no intervention at all (since if the American experts were right, the parents had done nothing wrong and suffered a huge tragedy AND had that compounded by a criminal trial) or place the issue before the Court to establish whether it was more likely than not that the younger child was at risk.

It is of course, awful, that the parents had to go through not only their loss, but two sets of legal proceedings to defend themselves and reach the truth, and that this process was no doubt gruelling, distressing, arduous and all consuming.

But I think those who criticise Islington for bringing the case perhaps misunderstand the position that they were in – it wasn’t a second bite of the cherry, but an untenable position that was only capable of being resolved by either the Local Authority taking a gamble that the American experts had been right and there was no risk to this child (and who would have been defending them had they taken that gamble and been wrong) or saying to a Court - this is beyond our scope to decide which set of medics is right, and that’s what you’re there for.

The Court could have taken a very robust view of the case at a really early stage and said, having viewed the criminal papers, it is understandable that the Local Authority have brought this case but there is no need for a finding of fact hearing and the Court is satisfied that the threshold isn’t met. That would effectively have taken that burden of managing an unknown risk off the shoulders of the Local Authority. The Court did not do that. The fact that the Court decided that the issues in the case had to be resolved by a four week finding of fact hearing meant that the issues were difficult and needed careful thought and resolution.

It might be, I know not, that when the evidence was heard, it was all blindingly obvious what the correct version of events was, but it wasn’t blindingly obvious until that process began, and I think that everyone involved in this process was just in a really difficult situation.

 

[Caveat - there's obviously a large range of nuance that can be applied by a Local Authority in this situation, from the extremes of "We don't believe that these parents did anything wrong, and invite the Court to give a brief judgment to that effect" to "the LA firmly believe in the medical views expressed by the Great Ormond Street medics, and seek the highest findings" and where this LA positioned themselves on that wide scale is probably critical]

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About suesspiciousminds

Law geek, local authority care hack, fascinated by words and quirky information; deeply committed to cheesecake and beer.

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