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The Costa dignity…. Financial abuse case

These cases always stir up my blood, and I ranted at my colleague sitting next to me about this one.

 

Re AH 2016

http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCOP/2016/9.html

 

In this one, a 95 year old woman, living in a care home and lacking capacity, had appointed her niece’s husband  Colin (is that a nephew-in-law?) to manage her affairs under a Lasting Power of Attorney in 2011.

[One might doubt, from the facts given that she had capacity to enter into that LPA in 2011, when she’d have been 90 years old. Not terribly reassured that The person who certified that Alma had capacity to create the LPA owns a hotel in the New Forest. He said that “Alma has been a personal friend of mine over the past 25 years and has always popped in to see me on her visits to the New Forest.”  ]

Since running her affairs for her, Colin has run up a debt of £100,000 on her nursing fees. He has withdrawn nearly £30,000 from her account. He has purchased a house and put it into her name  (hardly for her benefit, since she’s never going to live in it)

During that time, he has given her the princely sum of £260 of personal allowance. That equates to less than £10 per month – or about £2 per week. Generously, he has sent her about 1% of the money that he took out of her account.

(e) Mixing of funds. Alma and Colin have a joint bank account with Virgin Money. The table within the bundle highlights fifteen ‘concerning’ outgoings which remain unexplained and which were clearly not purchase made on Alma’s behalf including debits to the Odeon cinema, the Wilton Arms Hotel, Toby Carvery and Costa Coffee. Upon his appointment as Alma’s attorney, by continuing to have a ‘mixed account’, Colin breached his duty to keep Alma’s money separate from his contrary to paragraph 7.68 of the Code and has behaved in a way that is not in Alma’s best interests in breach of section 4 of the Act. Attorneys must, in most circumstances, keep finances separate to avoid the possibility of mistakes or confusion and this is not a situation of a husband acting as his wife’s attorney (for example) which might render the presumption to be rebutted.”

 

It doesn’t seem likely that this 95 year old woman, living in a nursing home in Oldham was out visiting the Odeon cinema and drinking coffee in Costa in the New Forest…

 

  1. Decision
  2. The Court of Protection General Visitor, who saw Alma on 19 January 2015, observed that she “has no verbal communication and her dementia is so advanced that she is unable to demonstrate any understanding of her needs or her environment.”
  3. I have no reason to doubt what the Visitor says and, on the balance of probabilities, I am satisfied that Alma lacks capacity to revoke the LPA.
  4. Colin’s management of her property and financial affairs has been a litany of failings.
  5. He failed to pay the nursing home fees and thereby put her placement in jeopardy.
  6. The nursing home had difficulty contacting him. He failed to reply to their letters and failed to return their calls.
  7. He failed to provide Alma with an adequate personal allowance. The stingy sum he did deign to pay her (£290 over 2½ years) amounted to less than £10 a month.
  8. Her clothes are old and worn and mostly hand-me-downs from former residents who have died or moved elsewhere.
  9. The Court of Protection Visitor concluded her report by saying that: “Alma would benefit from a full wardrobe of new clothing. In addition, she is reported to have loved to dance when she was mobile. The nursing home has provided a CD player but Alma would benefit from having her own music player and a range of CDs.”
  10. Colin failed to provide her with even these modest luxuries that could have enhanced her quality of life.
  11. He failed to account to the OPG. In fact, he failed to keep any accounts at all.
  12. He failed to produce bank statements.
  13. He failed to explain how he had managed to spend £29,489 of her money.
  14. He failed to act with honesty and integrity.
  15. He failed to keep Alma’s money separate from his own.
  16. And he failed to treat her with any semblance of dignity, empathy or respect.
  17. Having regard to all the circumstances, therefore, I satisfied that Colin has behaved in a way that contravenes his authority and is not in Alma’s best interests, and I shall revoke the LPA without further ado.

 

In the event that the police ever start prosecuting people like this for fraud or obtaining money by deception, I am more than willing to serve on a jury. Failing that, I hope the Devil has a Costa Coffee franchise in Hell, and that the Odeon there shows nothing other than “Failure to Launch” on rolling repeat.

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About suesspiciousminds

Law geek, local authority care hack, fascinated by words and quirky information; deeply committed to cheesecake and beer.

5 responses

  1. ashamedtobebritish

    Colin needs a good kicking from the family imp!
    My brother did the same with my mums inheritance 😦

  2. I have experienced this at first hand and I hope there is a special place in help reserved for this type of liar and thief. All so probate can be more sordid than crime !

  3. Gledhill, Angela

    Hello Suespsiciousminds

    Was’t this case
    Re AH 2016
    Refered to the police by the Ct of Protection or the care home?

    And if not why not?

    Do you know?

    Alex

    • I don’t know. I’m always hoping to see a footnote to one of these Court of Protection cases about the police intending to press charges, but it never seems to happen. I don’t think a jury would struggle with this sort of thing.

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