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Tag Archives: qualifications for writing Child Permanence report

Adoption as orthodoxy

 

 

 

I note that adoption is once again becoming a political football, with Government spokespersons holding it up to be the gold standard for children. We have been here before, and no doubt we will be here again.

This judgment from a Circuit Judge is therefore both timely and sadly timeless. None of what is said within it is newly binding (save that the Judge carefully and accurately records the statutory and regulatory sources, and the caselaw from which her analysis derives, and that some of the matters within it are long-standing regulations which have not been forensically inspected by a Court before) but I think all of what it contains is powerful and an important reminder of the stakes in which we are dealing when the Court is asked to make decisions about children’s futures.

It is also a case involving a decision about wasted costs in a highly flawed Placement Order application, and in which counsel who tried to be clever about the word ‘reprehensible’ received something of a lesson.

The case was heard by Her Honour Judge Lazarus (and my fingers in typing almost wrote ‘as she then was’ as though I had slipped forward in time a few years)

A (A Child : Flawed Placement Application) [2020] EWFC B2 (10 January 2020)

https://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWFC/OJ/2020/B2.html

 

The case involved a a girl of 4, whose parents had accepted that the threshold criteria were crossed and that they could not care for her. The only realistic options before the Court were a plan of adoption or a plan of long term fostering. The Local Authority sought a Placement Order and thus a plan of adoption.

 

An important issue in this case was how large an immediate and extended family this child had, and the careful need to consider the impact on the child of maintaining or severing relationships with that family.

 

  1. Another key element of that background, as already mentioned, is the very large family-centred tight-knit active family group that she belongs to. This already holds out the prospect of meaningful relationships with at least 29 individuals in this country in her immediate family (parents, siblings, grandparents, nephews and nieces) let alone the further dozens in the next ranks of her extended family (aunts, uncles, cousins), many of whom are close in age to A. Drifting too far from being able to create and maintain those relationships, and from some familiarity with their traditions, would be highly detrimental to A and the prospects of a future richly populated with loving relatives and their shared heritage. Supporting these aspects, and acknowledging the challenges given her characteristics, is very important to A’s long-term welfare.

 

 

The Judge made it clear that she was not critical of the Local Authority for considering an option of adoption

 

  1. To be clear, there is no criticism of the making of an application for a placement order itself. There would have been scope for this complex and finely balanced argument to be made properly to the court, and for the court to consider all the aspects of the issues applicable to such a serious step in order to determine the appropriate outcome

 

However, despite it being identified once the LA final evidence was filed that it was lacking in the necessary carefully balanced analysis and argument, and the Local Authority being given further opportunities to remedy that by addressing clearly identified missing issues in addendum evidence, the requisite quality of evidence never emerged. The LA had three such opportunities, including on the first day of the hearing, and matters ended up unravelling completely during the social work evidence.

 

  1. However, what analysis there was emerged as incomplete, partial, unsupported by sufficient evidence or reasoning. ‘Permanence’ was lauded above all else, with little rationale or substantiation or research to underpin that claim and the assumptions and assertions made.

 

 

  1. What analyses there were hardly touched upon the disadvantages to A of adoption and effective severance from her birth family, or the problems posed by her diagnoses in terms of any attempts to mitigate those losses.

 

 

  1. Negative observations in relation to the family were over-emphasised based on the slightest of evidence, and positive issues for which there was ample and good evidence were hardly mentioned if at all. Whole factors that would not sit easily with the plan for adoption were almost completely ignored. It was a skewed and highly partial approach.

 

 

  1. Ultimately, such an approach not only undermines the local authority’s own case for adoption because the good and substantial evidence and analysis required by the case law is simply absent, but it does not serve the child well nor assist the court.

 

 

  1. I entirely accept that there are, sadly, many cases where the drastic and life-changing severance of legal and other forms of relationship with birth families are justified. Often it is where the incapability of family members to meet a child’s needs or the risks of significant harm are very great, and where the benefits to the child of ongoing relationships with birth family members are scanty, being of poor quality, negative impact or largely non-existent in terms of any obvious positives or likely continuation.

 

 

  1. Here, the contrast with such situations was very great, with a very large loving connected family group holding positive respectful family values, celebrating a distinct culture and heritage, highly co-operative, admitting their area of parenting failure but otherwise forming a wide group of highly functional happy secure close adult and child family members, and offering consistent positive committed loving relationships to A, and in particular with siblings, nephews, nieces and cousins who are close to A’s age.

 

 

  1. 63.   This required careful, nuanced, thoughtful and balanced analysis. Instead, listening to the social worker’s oral evidence was a painful experience. Almost none of those benefits and contrasts were touched on at all. No research was referred to in her documents or oral evidence. It was difficult to get her to focus on A’s needs and characteristics, as opposed to reciting generalised assertions about adoption. It was clear that she initially thought she had fully reviewed A’s welfare interests, even though her document was largely a cut-and-paste copy of the initial CPR with a few further paragraphs added and a slightly expanded tabular discussion of various pros and cons.

 

 

  1. The process of cross-examination increasingly revealed glaring gaps and distorted arguments. It was telling that, despite the local authority claiming that it grasped that this was a complex and unusual case and that all the relevant issues had been considered, in fact very few of the relevant complexities were set out or analysed in any document and not even in this social worker’s re-amended document. It was further telling that, when the possibility of a contact order that would help to support A’s family relationships and her exposure to her culture and heritage was raised with the social worker, her first reaction was not to consider it in terms of A’s needs and characteristics but to protest that this would narrow the pool of prospective adopters.   A prime example of the tail wagging the dog.

 

 

  1. Overall, the local authority’s evidence was an effective demonstration of confirmation bias. The virtues of the permanence and security of a ‘forever family’, and which in abstract principle I do not doubt, nonetheless were sketchily asserted and additionally appeared to blind the social workers to the need to address those specific aspects of A’s needs and characteristics that did not fit with that proposal, and prevented any real analysis of permanent estrangement from her birth family.

 

 

  1. In particular, there was no evaluation of how that would work in combination with her likely cognitive difficulties, which would undoubtedly make it far harder if not impossible for her to benefit from sparse or indirect contact, or from using indirect resources such as the internet, language lessons or photographs to keep her in touch with her heritage and her family’s native languages and practices. There was no consideration whatsoever that there would be a high likelihood of adoption realistically resulting in an effectively drastic end to A’s ability to grasp aspects of her heritage, experience the warmth and breadth of her birth family, speak and understand some words of her parents’ native languages, feel and benefit from the sense of belonging to this large loving family with rich and coherent traditions – even if she could not live with them.

 

 

  1. The local authority’s approach was starkly epitomised in the following quotation and sole rationale in the initial ADM report: ‘given A’s age the only permanency option viable for A is adoption’. This assertion was made without any supporting analysis, let alone consideration of what other options might exist and how any option does or does not meet A’s needs and welfare interests.

 

 

  1. This flawed approach begs so many questions of this local authority. How is it that adoption appears to have become a kind of orthodoxy that requires inconvenient matters to be ignored and others to be twisted into its support? Is there an endemic automatic approach to a younger child’s age which results in a simplistic tick-box response instead of a careful analysis of her particular welfare interests? What sort of positive qualities would a birth family need to offer to be able to dislodge this approach to adoption and trigger a more balanced analysis and a preparedness to consider and address the full range of options? How has this local authority not followed the clear guidance of well-known law, and so failed to provide the evidence with which to ask the court to properly determine such a drastic and serious intervention in the life of this child?

 

 

  1. Ultimately, even with the further opportunities that the local authority had following the adjournment in November plus the further enhancement of the social worker’s written efforts at the outset of this hearing, the exposure of these failings led the local authority to perceive that it had again manifestly failed to meet its obligations and thus it withdrew its second placement application at this adjourned final hearing. The necessary evidence and reasoning that would have permitted this court to carry out the difficult balancing exercise had simply not been properly provided.

 

 

  1. These observations, and the local authority’s failure to meet these requirements of well-known law, become particularly pertinent given the local authority’s fundamentally flawed application for a placement order that led to the first final hearing being adjourned.

 

 

It is clear from what is said that both the original Child Permanence Report and the amended later versions were significantly flawed. The Judge summarises the statutory guidance and reminds us of the purpose of the Child Permanence Report – this is the document that fundamentally informs the Agency Decision Maker (the senior manager at a Local Authority, usually Assistant Director or Director level) as to the relevant information that leads that Agency Decision Maker (ADM) whether or not to make a decision that adoption should be the Local Authority plan. (An individual social worker cannot decide that adoption is the plan – they can recommend it to the ADM, but it is the ADM who decides). Therefore, the information in the Child Permanence Report (CPR) must be accurate, it must be fair, it must be balanced.

 

 

  1. The Statutory Guidance on Adoption provides that information must be accurate and distinguish fact from opinion:

 

1.17. Reports should be legible, clearly expressed and non-stigmatising. The information should be accurate and based on evidence that distinguishes between fact, opinion and third party information. The information should be checked to ensure that it is accurate and up to date before it is submitted to the adoption panel.

 

 

  1. The guidance goes on to explain why the accuracy of the CPR is so important:

 

2.64. The accuracy of the CPR is essential, since it will not only form the basis on which decisions are made about whether the child should be placed for adoption but will also assist the agency in matching the child with an appropriate prospective adopter, and will be the source of the information about the child on which the prospective adopter will rely. In due course the child, on reaching adulthood, will be able to request a copy of the CPR under the AIR and may have to rely on this document as the principal source of information about their pre-adoption history.

 

 

  1. The Court of Appeal has emphasised the legal requirement for the CPR to contain an analysis of all relevant placement options, including the reasons why adoption is the preferred plan. In Re B (care proceedings: proportionality evaluation) [2014] EWCA Civ 565, [2015] 1 FLR 884, concerning a successful appeal against a placement order, Ryder LJ observed that the CPR “ought to be one of the materials in which a full comparative analysis and balance of the realistic options is demonstrated … That was necessary not just for the court’s purposes but also for the local authority’s (adoption) agency decision maker whose decision is a pre-requisite to a placement application being made.”

 

 

 

 

  1. In Re S-F (a child) [2017] EWCA Civ 964 the Court of Appeal highlighted the need for reasoning to be specifically related to the child concerned:

 

The proportionality of interference in family life that an adoption represents must be justified by evidence not assumptions that read as stereotypical slogans. A conclusion that adoption is better for the child than long term fostering may well be correct but an assumption as to that conclusion is not evidence even if described by the legend as something that concerns identity, permanence, security and stability.

 

In order to have weight, the proposition that adoption is in the best interests of the child concerned throughout his life and is preferable to long term fostering should be supported by a social work opinion derived from a welfare analysis relating to the child. If appropriate, the conclusions of empirically validated research material can be relied upon in support of the welfare analysis, for example: research into the feasibility and success of different types of long term placements by reference to the age, background, social or medical characteristics. As this court has repeatedly remarked, the citation of other cases to identify the benefits of adoption as against long term fostering is no substitute for evidence and advice to the court on the facts of the particular case.’

 

 

There are regulations – The Restriction on the Preparation of Adoption Reports Regulations 2005 AND Adoption Statutory Guidance designed to ensure that this is the case. Pivotal amongst these is that the author of the Child Permanence Report must be qualified to write one, and must certify in the report whether they are so qualified, or whether their manager who is so qualified has supervised them in the writing of it. The qualification is three years of child social work, including direct experience of adoption work.   (In short, a social worker who is in the process of learning or has no direct experience of adoption work can only write the CPR if their manager (who HAS such experience) supervises them in the writing process. And by implication, as the manager has to sign off on the report that the manager is signing to say that the report does all it should.

  1. The guidance also sets out the expectations of the role of the supervisor:

 

1.15. For those individuals who are being supervised, their work should be supervised in accordance with their particular skills, experience and development needs. It is not necessary for the supervised social worker to be under the direct line management of the supervising social worker.

 

1.16. Where reports are being prepared by social work students, independent social workers or social workers who do not have the necessary experience, the draft report should be considered and discussed during supervision and signed off by a social worker with the necessary experience before the report is submitted to the adoption panel, another agency, or the court.

 

1.18. The person who prepares the report should sign and date it and indicate how they meet the requirements of the AAR. Where the person has been working under the supervision of a suitably qualified social worker, that social worker should sign the report as well, indicating the capacity they are working in and how they meet the requirements of the AAR.

 

 

In this case, the social worker was not suitably qualified, but instead of checking the box to say that she was not and having her manager sign to certify that it had been prepared under supervision simply checked the box saying that she was qualified, which she was not.

 

  1. Page 3 of the CPR specifically asks the author to confirm that they are suitably qualified under the Regulations to prepare this report. There is a numbered footnote next to that question, suggesting that further information on that point was available to the author while completing the document. The social worker’s response was “YES”.   The social worker has since explained that claiming that she was suitably qualified was simply an administrative error, an oversight. She should have marked NO, as she does not have the requisite experience under the Regulations.

 

 

  1. When the local authority was asked at court on the first day of the November hearing whether the social worker was in fact appropriately qualified and to provide details of her direct adoption experience the local authority’s response was that she does not have the requisite experience but “was supervised”.

 

 

  1. The space provided for details of the supervisor to be given has been left blank, which boxes also appear on page 3. It has been suggested that this is because the form uses a drop-down box format and that in clicking on YES the subsequent boxes did not then appear in order to be completed.

 

 

  1. However, I note that both the social worker and her team manager provided their signatures in the relevant boxes on page 3. They would both have had the opportunity and should have seen on the same page that they were signing, that the relevant boxes in relation to the Name and Signature of the supervisor were blank, and that the social worker had wrongly confirmed that she was a qualified person under the Regulations.

 

 

  1. I also note that in his statement the Director of Children’s Services referred to two individuals said to have supervised the social worker to the satisfaction of the relevant Regulations: her service manager and her assistant team manager. He claims that the supervision involved: ‘initial planning… including identifying who needed to be seen and interviewed, reviews of previously completed CPRs to inform the process of completion of the index CPR, and discussions about the conclusions of the same.’

 

 

  1. There are no details given of the capacity of either of these two individuals to fall within the relevant supervisor category, or of which of them carried out what supervisory tasks and exactly how that satisfied the regulations. There are no notes or records provided of supervision sessions. Tellingly, there is no assertion in his statement that either of them read the report or considered its contents beyond ‘discussions about the conclusions’. Clearly, neither of them signed the CPR, even though, if supervision were being adequately conducted, they would have expected this to be asked of them.

 

 

  1. It is clearly possible that the local authority may have committed a criminal offence under section 94 Adoption and Children Act 2002 and the Preparation of Adoption Reports Regulations 2005, but I cannot conclude whether that is the case or not. I note the Director’s refutation of this accusation. This is not the tribunal in which a summary offence is tried. I have not been provided with sufficient information to assist with any safe conclusion either way, nor would it be proportionate in the circumstances of this case to conduct an examination of all the background facts and the detailed nature of the supervision said to have been provided.

 

 

  1. At the very least, this ‘oversight’ was therefore missed by four people: the social worker, her team manager, her assistant team manager and her service manager. I am driven to suspect, but cannot properly put it higher than suspicion, that this oversight may possibly have been a consequence of ignorance of the requirements, the Regulations and of this offence.

 

 

  1. Additionally and significantly, adequate supervision should have identified the numerous deficiencies in content and analysis that are now admitted by the local authority.

 

 

  1. It also remains unclear who in the local authority holds the position of agency advisor as the individual with overall responsibility for quality assurance of the CPR, and whether this document was ever seen by this individual. This again begs the question as to what checking systems are in place, and how such an inadequate report, written by a social worker who did not have the experience required by law to write such a report, was permitted to be submitted to the ADM.

 

The CPR, as well as missing significant information and a balanced analysis, contained within it assertions as though they were fact, when the LA knew that the parents disputed those assertions and were not asking the Court to make findings. That sounds complex, so let’s unpack it

 

If there’s an allegation in proceedings that daddy hit Jack with a stick, then those allegations become a fact if :-

(a)Daddy admits it

(b)Daddy is convicted of it

(c)The Local Authority invite the Court to find as a fact that it happened and the Court, having tested the evidence does so.

 

 

In the absence of (a) or (b), if the Local Authority want to be accurate in the CPR they say “There is an allegation, yet to be proven, that the father hit Jack with a stick, the father denies it saying ___________, the evidence that the LA rely on that it happened is ___________ and the Court will be asked to find this as a fact”OR “There was an allegation made on _____ about physical mistreatment, this is denied and the Local Authority accept that there is not sufficient evidence for the Court to be asked to make a finding”

To simplify even further – this is the LA having their cake and eating it. Relying on the allegation to persuade an ADM that adoption is the plan, without going to the effort of proving it. This is WRONG.

 

  1. In addition to the above acknowledgements, it is also the case that the CPR contains much information presented as fact (for example pages 18-19) even though the local authority should have been aware it was disputed by the parents and it was not pursuing findings in respect of the disputed issues. This is particularly concerning given that paragraph 2.64 of the Guidance emphasises the need for accuracy, and that a CPR is often an important and sometimes sole source of information for a prospective adopter and for the child (see 2.64 set out at paragraph 82 above).

 

It is astonishing really that this needs saying, but it clearly does. As a Local Authority, if you are putting a disputed allegation onto the balancing scales to make decisions, then you need to seek to PROVE it. If you have decided you don’t think you can prove it, or that it isn’t proportionate to ask the Court to do so, then you DON’T GET TO PUT the allegation on the scales. Put up or shut up.

 

 

The ADM doesn’t escape condemnation

 

AGENCY DECISION MAKER’S DECISION –

 

 

  1. Given the manifest failures to comply properly with the Act and the Regulations and applicable guidance and case law in relation to the CPR, it was clearly not possible for the initial ADM to have made a valid and lawful decision based upon that material (Re B (Placement Order) [2008] supra, quoted in paragraph 78 above).

 

 

  1. It is also plain that the ADM in any event in her own right failed to comply with the relevant law and guidance in the decision dated 12 September 2019. The decision is set out in nine paragraphs which summarise the background history and then concludes with a single sentence as the only analysis or rationale for the ADM’s decision: “However, given A’s age the only permanency option viable for A is adoption”.

 

 

  1. This is shockingly poor and in breach of the relevant law and guidance. In particular:

 

–         The ADM failed to consider whether the social worker was permitted to prepare the report under The Restriction on the Preparation of Adoption Reports Regulations 2005.

 

–         The ADM failed to identify any arguments for or against adoption or long-term foster care, save for A’s age, and failed to give any reason for the decision, save for the child’s age.

 

–         The ADM’s sole reason appears to amount to an orthodoxy or set policy based on age alone and showed the local authority had failed even to consider long-term foster care as an option at all.

 

–         The ADM failed to consider any of the factors in the welfare checklist save for A’s age. This excluded any consideration of A’s background and identity, the impact of her needs and developmental issues, her relationships with her relatives (not only her parents but siblings and wider family), and the value of those relationships continuing.

 

 

 

  1. The Director of Children’s Services claims in his statement that the ADM had, in fact, taken the full welfare checklist into account, but had simply failed to record that exercise. He also accepts that the key arguments for and against adoption were not articulated in the report, and concedes that these failures to meet requirements resulted in a flawed placement application. In my judgment, his concessions do not go far enough and do not even reflect the local authority’s own guidance that was in existence at the time of the decision.

 

 

Nor does the Local Authority legal department

 

   It is the local authority’s legal team who will have taken the relevant steps to issue the placement application. In doing so, the lawyer handling this case should have read the relevant documents underpinning the proposed application. This should have immediately caused the lawyer to flag concerns relating to the adequacy of the CPR and the ADM decision, and whether the ADM could have made a lawful decision on the basis of the CPR.

 

 

  1.                      This should have led to the matter being referred, if it had not been referred already, to the agency advisor for review of the documents in question.

 

 

  1. It also should have led the lawyer to refer the matter back to the social work team, service manager or other senior member of Children’s Services in order to rectify the situation.

 

 

  1. The issue of a placement application should not become a rubber-stamping exercise, but a rigorous examination of whether the legal requirements for such a serious application have been met

 

I would completely agree with this. It might to implement it properly, need an adjustment of Court timetables. A Placement Order application is a huge piece of work, and because generally the social work evidence comes in right against the deadline if not already late, a Local Authority lawyer is working frantically to get the application issued as soon as possible, so that other parties can respond and the court timetable does not get derailed. We need to make time to do what is such a critical job properly, even if that means having to seek to vary the Court timetable to give it the time it needs. Child Permanence Reports are dense documents, the application form for Placement Orders is, as any Local Authority lawyer will tell you, the absolute WORST form to fill in, you’re doing it at the same time as checking all of the final evidence and care plans. It takes more time to do right than we are able to give it. And what normally has to give there is that the task is delivered in the time you’ve got, not the time you need.

(None of this is intended to be excuses, it is context. Similar things are true at every stage of this flawed process – everyone is working to the time they’ve got, rather than the time they need. Sometimes we need to stand up and say ‘we need more time please Judge, because…’ and let the Judge decide)

 

As a result of the flaws in this case, the Court considered whether to make a wasted costs order (i.e that the Council should pay for everyone else’s legal costs)

They were ordered to pay the costs of one day of the Court hearing

DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION

 

 

  1. Appropriately, the local authority has recognised that its actions place it at risk for the costs of at least part of the three days of the November hearing. The Respondents’ costs are all met by the Legal Aid Agency, and I have taken into account their respective similar positions in defending the funds of that agency and requesting that a costs order is made against the local authority for the three days.

 

 

  1. It was suggested on behalf of the local authority that these issues should have been drawn to the local authority’s attention by others at the Issue Resolution Hearing in late September. I reject that submission. None of these flaws should have been permitted to have tainted the documents and decisions of the local authority in the first place, none of the issues are novel but are well-known aspects of statute, case law and guidance. These were the standard responsibilities of the local authority, and not of the other parties nor the court.

 

 

  1. 137.                       Counsel also, ingeniously but unsuccessfully, attempted to suggest that the court should consider that the actions of the local authority were not ‘unreasonable’ or ‘reprehensible’ as they were the result of oversights rather than bad faith.

 

 

  1. The ordinary dictionary meaning of ‘reprehensible’ is ‘deserving censure or condemnation’ and derives from the latin verb meaning ‘rebuke’. I consider that each and every error identified in the local authority’s process deserves censure and could and should have been avoided. It was unreasonable to issue a placement application based on such material and, given the nature of the underlying errors, where the law relating to the standards to expect of evidence and analysis in adoption cases should be so well-known.

 

 

  1. The starting point here is that without the numerous and egregious errors of the local authority a flawed placement application would have been avoided in the first place and there would have been no need to adjourn the November final hearing.

 

 

  1. I do not consider that it was inappropriate to propose a plan for adoption and to seek a placement order, but the method by which it was pursued and applied for was riddled with avoidable error and failure to comply with important rules and requirements.

 

 

  1. Counsel for the local authority also urged upon me the positive steps taken by the local authority since November, and that the local authority could be said to have needed to have taken some significant time to consider the issues arising at the November final hearing and so should only bear the costs of a single day. The first point is a good one, and the second fails given that the errors should never have seen the light of day or gone ahead uncorrected in the first place.

 

 

  1. I welcome and bear in mind those positive steps outlined by the Director of Children’s Services, and consider that they go some way towards mitigating the local authority’s position. I have directed that the local authority should write to inform the court of the completion of each step identified by the Director and that I have mentioned in paragraphs 124-127 above.

 

 

  1.      I note that the pressures on the budgets of hard-pressed local authorities is very great, and that any costs order deprives this local authority of funds which can be used to assist children and families in need.

 

 

  1. In the circumstances, and bearing in mind the overriding objective, although it can quite properly be said that this local authority was responsible for the unnecessary adjournment of a final hearing and the waste of those three days, I am satisfied that it is sufficient censure to point this out in the context of the criticisms of this detailed judgment, to take into account the positive steps that are anticipated will prevent such avoidable errors in future, and to require the local authority to meet the Respondents’ costs of one day of the November hearing. Costs will be assessed.

 

 

 

 

  1. Finally, it will be noted that I have not named any single professional employed at this local authority. The local authority, quite properly and as required by case law, is identified. However, the problems appear to be systemic and wide-ranging. The identified problems touch each element of this local authority that has become involved in this case: social work, supervision, management, decision-making, legal advice, internal training, standards and checking systems, and ranging from social worker to lawyer to Director. Accordingly, it would be misleading and would attach too narrow a focus to name any single individual.

 

 

What this judgment is NOT, is a balance of whether long-term fostering is better than adoption for children generally. Instead, it is a careful reminder that in order to make a decision that involves permanent separation of a child from the parents and their family, the evidence has to be tested, it has to be accurate, it has to be checked, it has to be fair, and that processes, guidance and caselaw that are laid down to achieve that are ignored or bypassed not only at our peril but at the expense of justice and the children that we are working to help.